Spuds

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  • 18th January 2021 at 5:47 pm #542669

    Anyone successfully growing their own potatoes in 22?

    We received the usual stack of promos this morning and I notice our local Espace Emeraude is pushing seed potatoes.  Its always the same around here.  If I race over and buy them immediately I will have some chance of getting the blight resistant ones that I seek.  But according to advice I find online, it is a full two months too early to plant them.  Stored in the dark they will have huge white sprouts that suck the life out of the tuber by planting time.  Stored in the light the same thing happens but they are green.

    How does anyone else get on?  Almost nothing else will grow on my patch apart from runner beans which I don’t like.

    18th January 2021 at 5:58 pm #542671

    I don’t grow a lot of them, but I’m now using the ones that have already started to germinate from the bag I bought to eat during the winter. I don’t plant them in the ground. I cut the grass the shorter I can, put them on the ground, put some compost on top of each one, grass cutting on the top. Then I keep addind the grass cutting around each plant as they are growing. Believe me or not, it has worked well, and a lot less work as there is no digging at all. I’m starting them in may.

    It works for us as it’s only a small production, I don’t know how it will work on a bigger scale

     

    Here is a video, in French but it will give you an idea

    18th January 2021 at 6:32 pm #542672

    Busy setting up my rather large wicking bed garden this year here.  In the space left, I will try babeth’s suggestion.

    18th January 2021 at 6:48 pm #542674

    Gotta do that Babeth.
    My back thanks you.

    18th January 2021 at 8:50 pm #542679

    I’m a long way from 22, but I can offer some advice that might help. Seed potatoes are (I’m fairly certain) cold stored before they go on sale. Being taken out of cold storage and moved to a warmer environment triggers the sprouting. If you can provide them with a cold, (between 2 and 7 degrees) airy, and ideally dark place, you should be able to inhibit the sprout growth. You can even rub off the young sprouts to prolong the time you can leave them in storage without weakening the spuds too much.

    If you have a successful and healthy crop and have a suitable storage place,  save some potatoes to plant the following year.  There is every chance that they will keep longer, without sprouting, than shop bought seed potatoes.

    Anonymous
    19th January 2021 at 11:10 am #542741

    I used to grow charlottes (my fave spud) to be ready before blight strikes. I start chitting in Feb then plant at the end of March. Frost may get the first shoots a bit but have found they regrow fine.

    Can’t wait to be finally growing veg again this year and am going to try the method Babeth has suggested. I’ve heard about it and was interested in trying it and it’s good to hear it works ok. Thanks Babeth 🌷

     

    19th January 2021 at 11:45 am #542749

    Just for pleasure, another small video 1m, with Jean 82 year old !

     

    What would be interested to do, but I won’t, is to make a square with the digging method and the same with the permaculture method and compare the result.

    19th January 2021 at 12:04 pm #542753

    I’m gutted, all I ever get is blight but will attempt this indoors in boxes under growing lights.

    19th January 2021 at 1:21 pm #542764

    I’m definitely going to try that Babeth!! Thank you! (Jean is wonderful and I understood everything he said!)

    19th January 2021 at 3:13 pm #542780

    I’m a long way from 22, but I can offer some advice that might help. Seed potatoes are (I’m fairly certain) cold stored before they go on sale. Being taken out of cold storage and moved to a warmer environment triggers the sprouting. If you can provide them with a cold, (between 2 and 7 degrees) airy, and ideally dark place, you should be able to inhibit the sprout growth. You can even rub off the young sprouts to prolong the time you can leave them in storage without weakening the spuds too much. If you have a successful and healthy crop and have a suitable storage place, save some potatoes to plant the following year. There is every chance that they will keep longer, without sprouting, than shop bought seed potatoes.

    That temperature range is about right for our bedroom, and with no insulation or even a ceiling lining there is always plenty of air swishing about.

    19th January 2021 at 4:39 pm #542787

    I am in 29 and now only ever grow earlies in a raised bed as the blight can be horrendous ie appears overnight

    Anyone tried growing “Jersey Royals” ie international kidney with lots of seaweed?

    19th January 2021 at 5:02 pm #542790

    Interesting OC, is this like the hay method but with seaweed?

    19th January 2021 at 9:24 pm #542820

    That temperature range is about right for our bedroom, and with no insulation or even a ceiling lining there is always plenty of air swishing about.

    Sounds ideal, for the potatoes, at least.

    Anonymous
    19th January 2021 at 9:31 pm #542822

    Interesting film .

    I’ve never seen potatoes that grow without a potato plant , or is that just for the film ?

    Surely the potato planted has to put down roots so that the tubers can grow on them ? :unsure:

    19th January 2021 at 9:44 pm #542825

    Of course there is a potato plant growing, they are just showing the start and the end. On the first film, you can see the plants, but to make it shorter, this is how it looks like. It would be perfect against the american beetles if no plant was growing, but …

    Anonymous
    19th January 2021 at 9:48 pm #542826

    Okaaaaaay ! Thanks Babeth , I just wondered why they had made the film then , I only saw the one without plants .

    You have problems with colorado beetles ?

    19th January 2021 at 9:48 pm #542827

    and here you can see them growing

    19th January 2021 at 9:50 pm #542828

    Yep, its a shame there wasn’t a clip of them mid season.  The “fanes” must have been removed before harvest.

    I’ve used a similar system, just placing the seed potatoes on well rotted manure and covering them with straw. It worked well in that it would have produced a good crop, but I have a terrible rataupier problem here and the rataupiers love the protection of mulch. They had a field day. :cry:

    19th January 2021 at 9:56 pm #542829

    Not on the first crop I did in may. Later in the summer, my mum and dad were going to throw potatoes well germinated, so I said why not to try another crop with them instead of throwing them (I hate wasting), and then I had a colorado beetle attack :cry:

    19th January 2021 at 9:58 pm #542831

    Yep, its a shame there wasn’t a clip of them mid season

    Here it is :

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DbnFxCO3ZFg

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