Garden, it's time for ….

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  • 1st October 2019 at 11:06 am #503772

    Just a though, as there are good gardeners on this forum, would it be possible to share what to do in the garden at the minute, for exemple “time to plant the onions” ? I know it would be very helpfull for me, so could be also helpful for other members.

    1st October 2019 at 1:31 pm #503796

    It’s a good thought Babeth and I always see what Monty Don says for ‘Jobs for this weekend’ on his Friday night TV programme (I know you haven’t got a TV so one of us could let you know!)

    1st October 2019 at 1:55 pm #503811

    Which part of France does Monty Don live in ? :-)

    Anonymous
    1st October 2019 at 3:51 pm #503829

    To be fair planting times won’t be that different between Brittany and Herefordshire where Monty lives. His garden does always seem a few weeks behind though, I’ve noticed his daffodils are still in bloom when ours have been and gone….

    1st October 2019 at 4:49 pm #503834

    Any suggestion of what we can plant in october ?

    1st October 2019 at 6:10 pm #503843

    If your ground is not too wet/cold you can plant broad beans direct into the soil so you get an early crop  I have found that the pink flowered varieties are best for this

    You can plant winter salads as well if you have protection  Mache is quite good as it will tolerate cold but there are other varieties available

    Clear up fallen leaves etc so slugs and snails have nowhere to overwinter but leave seed heads for the birds If you have bare soil consider a green manure such as alfalfa

    1st October 2019 at 6:42 pm #503862

    Thank you very much Office Crabtree :rose:

    1st October 2019 at 6:47 pm #503865

    I’m going to plant  Bulbs this week .

     

     

    1st October 2019 at 6:54 pm #503867

    We will be planting garlic and onion sets outside depending how much it rains and will be trying broad beans for the first time ( agree officer crabtree) outside.

    In the tunnel, sowing white and red onions, spinach, winter lettuce and depending on the weather forecast perhaps peas.

    Everything depends on the weather , seeing as there has been hardly any frost the last couple of years we have to start thinking differently about the cycle.

    We bring a leaf mulch of 20/30 cms ( when the leaves have fallen ) on the plot that we use for beans and peas next year , and will be mucking the plot for the garlic and onions. :yes: :yes:

     

     

     

    1st October 2019 at 7:53 pm #503872

    I planted some bulbs once, kept switching off and on off and on, drove me nuts.

    1st October 2019 at 8:05 pm #503873

    Which part of France does Monty Don live in ?

    My comment doesn’t apply to you Deboer, where I live is not too much different in temperature to where Monty Don is in the UK and I can make adjustments accordingly, anyway I imagine you wouldn’t need Monty’s advice.

    1st October 2019 at 8:18 pm #503885

    About 500 km North of you Fruitcake with a land climate . (Herefordshire that is )  I know it well because that is where my sheep breed comes from . :-)

    There is so much difference between various locations for vegetable gardening . I have gardening books in Dutch ,German, French and English and they all tell you different things to plant at differing times . Best people to ask about growing veg. in an area are the local people that have grown their own veg. in that area for generations.

    Also we are a bit different , we don’t dig our garden like most people do . :-)

     

    1st October 2019 at 8:29 pm #503896

    My French neighbour, who has a very large veggie garden and I swap ideas (she now grows runner beans!)

    What did you mean ‘with a land climate’ Deboer? As I said I make adjustments accordingly, but he reminds me about things that I might forget to do with his ‘Jobs for this weekend’

    I like to double dig my veg plot, not necessarily because I believe it to be better, although my dad who had a very productive garden always did, but simply because I really enjoy digging!

    2nd October 2019 at 9:28 am #503980

    A land climate is an area that is influenced by land as opposed to a sea climate .

    The further you are from the sea ( or behind mountains ) the less the climate is influenced by the sea .

    Land climates tend to have colder dryer weather , sea climates warmer wetter , also depending on the prevailing wind direction.

    We don’t dig , so as not to destroy the natural levels of the soil . There are different organisms at different depths that keep the soil healthy . We mulch the top and let the earthworms do the rest.

    My father double dug his allotement too, he also used pesticides, herbicides and artificial fertilisers ( a bit of a chemical stew) :yes: :yes:

    2nd October 2019 at 11:07 am #503990

    I have found so much differing of advice-when to plant what, etc.   I usually plant stuff when it is available in the shops.  How would I manage to plant onion sets or spuds when there are none to be had?    :unsure:

    2nd October 2019 at 5:24 pm #504029

    Deboer wrote

    A land climate is an area that is influenced by land as opposed to a sea climate.

    Well we’re 60 km from the sea, probably 100km less than Monty but I don’t think we’re too affected by it as quite often what is in his garden is in mine, but just at a slightly different time.

    As I said I like to dig because I enjoy it, in fact, I love it and although it’s always satisfying when we get produce from the garden, getting pleasure from working in it is as important to me – oh and I’m sure my dad used pesticides like yours but I don’t.

    2nd October 2019 at 5:26 pm #504031

    Shapeshifter wrote;

    I have found so much differing of advice-when to plant what, etc.   I usually plant stuff when it is available in the shops.  How would I manage to plant onion sets or spuds when there are none to be had?

    Like you Sh-sh, I watch what the locals buy for planting and what my neighbour plants, I’m sure they know what they’re doing.

    Anonymous
    2nd October 2019 at 5:44 pm #504042

    I used to plant my Charlotte spuds at the end of March which my French neighbour thought was hilarious, far too early but I always got a great crop and ready before blight inevitabily struck. :unsure:

    2nd October 2019 at 6:34 pm #504045

    [quote quote=503990]I have found so much differing of advice-when to plant what, etc. I usually plant stuff when it is available in the shops. How would I manage to plant onion sets or spuds when there are none to be had? :unsure:[/quote]

    We harvest as much as possible of our own seed , so can plant when we want .

    Onions sets and garlic are available now , or you can use organic garlic which is available all year in the veg shops . Same with potatoes , organic potatoes that are not treated to stop them sprouting are available all year round too . :-)

     

    2nd October 2019 at 6:42 pm #504053

    [quote quote=504029]Deboer wrote

    A land climate is an area that is influenced by land as opposed to a sea climate.

    Well we’re 60 km from the sea, probably 100km less than Monty but I don’t think we’re too affected by it as quite often what is in his garden is in mine, but just at a slightly different time. As I said I like to dig because I enjoy it, in fact, I love it and although it’s always satisfying when we get produce from the garden, getting pleasure from working in it is as important to me – oh and I’m sure my dad used pesticides like yours but I don’t.[/quote]

    Yup . Herefordshire is about 200 km from the sea and behind the Black mountains of Wales . There is a temprature difference with Brehan of about 4 degrees and less light , being further North.

    We don’t enjoy digging.

    We enjoy eating healthy self produced food and like to see all the animals that inhabit our garden and help us to that end.

    So what are you doing in the garden at the moment Fruitcake ? :-)

    2nd October 2019 at 7:16 pm #504067

    Not very much now Deboer, tying in the new growth of blackberries, harvesting the butternut squash and peppers then, when they are all done with, I shall do my digging, get the horse manure from our friends to cover all the plot with, then leave it for the winter. The flower gardens on the other hand still need a lot of tidying which I shall get on with when we return from another trip over to the UK for a family gathering, no more trips planned in the foreseeable future after that so I can then get back to decorating and gardening with a vengeance!

    3rd October 2019 at 9:42 am #504186

    Back to the original subject as started by the OP.

    We bought white and red onion seed , winter lettuce and spinach seed to sow in our tunnel ( also 4 cauliflower plants )  yesterday

    Onion sets and garlic for outside in the garden , once we have harvested the rest of our beans either for eating as dried beans or to keep for seed for next year.

    The tomatoes,peppers and aubergines are still ripening in the tunnel and the courgettes producing outside.

    We have tried sweet potatoe outside for the first time this year , it’s still growing .

    We are 450 km South of Brittany and our climate is more land than sea ,  the winds have changed from our usual SouthWest to more North this year , so we have a lot less rain.

    Being further South than most of the members of this site , I am not sure if our garden info. will be of any use , but can post it now and again . :-)

     

     

    Anonymous
    3rd October 2019 at 10:40 am #504212

    I envy all of you who grow your own veg. There is nothing better, than picking fresh produce, on the day, for your evening meal etc.

    My dad used to grow all his own veg and I can still see him now, digging up his new potatoes, giving them to my mum to prepare and cook, then we would eat them that evening smothered in butter :good:  The taste was awesome.

    I tried growing my own, but went mad and planted as much as I could in one go! Then, with working full time, couldn’t tend to my veg patch as I should have, resulting in poor crops and weeds galore! :negative: :cry:

     

    3rd October 2019 at 10:41 am #504214

    I always start the Broad beans off in pots inside. If not I lose the lot to mice and voles. once the seedlings get leaves I plant them out and the rodents leave them alone.

    Tried to harvest the carrots yesterday, they had lovely tops but they had been eaten from below by the mice. The teeth marks were very clear.

    3rd October 2019 at 12:38 pm #504226

    [quote quote=504214]I always start the Broad beans off in pots inside. If not I lose the lot to mice and voles. once the seedlings get leaves I plant them out and the rodents leave them alone. Tried to harvest the carrots yesterday, they had lovely tops but they had been eaten from below by the mice. The teeth marks were very clear.[/quote]

    You have a vole problem .

    We put out mousetraps that catch the voles ( it’s a shame I know ) before they can eat the veg. Our cat catches some as well .

    We have tried broad beans before, in the Spring . This will be the first time we will try to grow them in the Autumn . :-)

    3rd October 2019 at 5:42 pm #504319

    Mr. F. does the same with broad beans bonjour

    12th October 2019 at 9:04 pm #505982

    – Broad beans planted

    – Bulbs (Iris and Tulips) planted

    Onion and garlic, they normaly don’t sell them in this period, but our garden center said it was a good idea, and they are going to order the winter ones and will be available in 10 days. They’ve insisted to plant them in a well drained place.

    12th October 2019 at 9:17 pm #505985

    We will be planting onions and garlic tomorrow ( although Jen used some of the garlic in the ratatouille today ! )

    Monty Don said ( Friday) sow broad beans and onions , for those without TV . :-)

    15th October 2019 at 12:42 am #506386

    Hubby’s job this week is to prepare the soil for next Spring’s planting. He turns it over and puts compost from our own bins and then a layer of seaweed over the top. The seaweed dries and the worms do the rest. Our soil is virtually all sand so is very easy to dig. He has had to throw away all the broccoli this week as they were FULL of critters, just impossible to salvage anything from them at all. Not to worry as all the plants are picked up from the road from the many tractors and trailers that pass and drop them! We get many plants this way!

    15th October 2019 at 9:40 am #506406

    I looked up ” critters” , non the wiser .

    What sort of beasts did you have in your broccoli ?

    Just out of interest . :-)

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