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This topic contains 14 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  jeffp 9 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #32847

    Anonymous
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    What is your opinion regarding the reintroduction of wild animals to the UK and France, in paticular, Bears to France and Lynx to the UK?

    I have been lucky enough to see a Lynx in Portugal.

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    #32849

    Anonymous
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    I’m not so sure that reintroducing carnivores where they are no longer indigenous is such a good idea.  It has worked wonderfully well for the Red Kite, where the population has increased dramatically on both sides of the channel.

    However, I wonder what the purpose is of reintroduction? Apart from deer, I cannot think what other prey animals are out of control and need another predator.  The problem with reintroduction of Lynx into wild areas such as Kielder Forest is monitoring the death rate and the deliberate killing of these animals by land owners who do not wish to see them on their ‘shoots’, and farmers who think they will predate on their sheep.  In both cases I believe there are compensation schemes, so no losses should be incurred.

    There is also a wolf pack in existence within a huge enclosed area on the Shropshire/Wales border ready for release should that project be given the go ahead. His problem is he cannot buy enough land in Scotland to make this project really viable. http://www.wolfwatch.uk/about/

    I have no knowledge about bear reintroduction in France, but aren’t European brown bears already wild in the Spanish Pyrenees, Bill?  I saw a programme about this a while ago and I believe the plan would be to reintroduce them from the wild stock in Poland?  Same applies here regarding land owners and farmers methinks.

    I’m definitely ambivalent about this?   :unsure:

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    #32900

    Anonymous
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    Yes bears in the Pyrenees, but last time I was there, a lot of local opposition was displayed! regarding the introduction of E European bears.

    My personal view, is, I would not be happy about carnivores lynx, wolves, bears etc being introduced onto my immediate ‘patch’.

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    #32935

    vette
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    October 13, 2016 Ambrieres les Vallees

    We had a guest from the Oxford area last week saying that the Red Kite were killing off the smaller birds. Not all good news then unfortunately.  :unsure:

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    #32972

    bluevelvet
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    October 13, 2016 Northumberland

    Well if you reintroduce a species that’s had died out or being hunted too much, it will itself need a good source of food.  I’m not convinced it’s a good idea at all.  Plus then you have animals that have escaped, wild mink ,  for example , that Is causing a lot of bother with other wildlife. The red Kites are a beautiful bird , but not at the expense of the small birds.

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    #32978

    Anonymous
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    Not any sympathy for protecting game birds, reared purely to be shot for ‘sport’,

    When I lived in Scotland, keepers shot buzzards kites etc as Vermin :negative:

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    #47634

    napoleon
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    February 5, 2018 La Chatre, Indre and Surrey

    I watched one of the U.K. Wildlife programmes last week with a long section on red kites. I had thought they were typical birds of prey but these “experts” stated clearly, in answer to the specific question of their effect on other wildlife, that they lived on carrion. The conclusion was that the small bird population was safe from the red kite.
    It is becoming commonplace to see large groups of red kites circling monotonously but I have never noticed them diving as if in pursuit of live prey. This is in the Berkshire, Bucks, Hampshire, Wiltshire, Oxfordshire area. They are moving down the motorways, railways and rivers into more urban areas. I am sure this was not the original intention.

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    #47809

    farmerchris
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    Man as a species has never really “thought out ” the consequences of introducing( or reintroducing ) either on purpose or by plan, species into other countries/habitats . Even introducing a different mentality or religion ?

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    #47830

    bungle
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    We are top of the food chain, the planets number one predator, the reason that various species no longer inhabit large areas of the planet is because they are not compatible with us. Reintroduction won’t change this, they will still be incompatible.

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    #47852

    jeffp
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    Kie are scavengers, so not such a danger to smaller birds?

    DIET.

    The kite will adapt its diet according to local conditions – it is an opportunistic feeder and a scavenger – feedling mainly on carrion. They are also known to frequent landfill sites, and can be seen scavenging together with the gulls. Being an opportunistic bird, it will also take live prey, such as small mammals and small birds, usually the sick weak or injured. Beetles and worms also feature on the menu.

    From the Red Kite info page.

    FAR more dangerous for songbirds etc is the large population of house cats. My friend has four, they bring 6-8 small birds a DAY!!!
    I once worked for a lady who had two. I went once and found FIVE greenfinches on her kitchen floor.

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    #47916

    bungle
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    Cats do indeed account for an awfull lot of small wildlife deaths, but the biggest killer by far is still us.

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    #48024

    farmerchris
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    So you are out killing song birds Bungle ?

    I must admit that the “human race ” is destroying it’s own habitat , plus the habitats of everything that “we ” love , ( you know , all the fluffy and feathery things that look so sweet ) .

    What will be left  are the species that enjoy living in “our ” waste . Those species that we distaste and that we have been trying to destroy for generations but keep evolving faster than we can kill them ?

    We are creating the future for our children and generations of humans to come ,  no-one REALLY cares , so as usual future generations will live with the mistakes of “our democratically elected leaders” and the ” will of the people ”  :yes:  :yes:

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    #48028

    jo-infrance
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    You are right Chris. We turn a blind eye to things. We all do it, me included.
    So much of our ‘normal’ daily lives has an adverse effect on the environment. It’s almost as if we can’t help ourselves. decades of conditioning have convinced us that we ‘need’ certain products, certain regimes and routines. Just think of the adverse environmental impact of something as simple as shower gel or face cream. And our impact at a microscopic level has a knock on effect all the way up the food chain. That’s apart from the direct impact on our physical and mental health. Sometimes I despair of the world…

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    #48032

    farmerchris
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    Don’t despair of the world Jo, i’m sure it will turn out as it has too .Humanity can’t help itself , i’m sure there are still great lessons that we have to learn ?

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    #48057

    jeffp
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    Some of us try. I deliberately leave areas of nettles for certain butterfly caterpillars, both here in the UK and in France. We also plant for butterflies, and feed wild birds at times of need.

    Mind, the French nettles seem to be able to reach 2.5m, and on being cut down or pulled up, I’m sure I’ve heard the odd one snarl at me…

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